United in resistance – Letters spark solidarity across continents

Kindling an international correspondence across 5,000 miles of land and sea, over the past year anti-mining activists from Doima (Colombia), Balcombe (UK) and Krobo (Ghana) have reached out to one another to express solidarity in their shared struggles against the extractive industries.

For all three communities this exchange is the latest in a series of efforts to reach out to other mining affected communities who are defending their land, water and livelihoods. Their story has inspired a short film – In Solidarity – which will be released later this year.

8450389223_29c1a22da8_oMore than words

Last year the Doima community’s stirring letter to the inhabitants of Balcombe, UK was featured on The Gaia Foundation’s website. The letter, written by Mariana Gomez, an anthropologist and activist who has been central in the communities Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 16.28.50resistance against a gold mine, expressed her and fellow activists’ admiration for the Balcombe residents’ struggle against fracking. A struggle which they had seen in the media and which acted as a powerful message that struggles against the juggernaut of the extractives sector were by no means limited to Colombia or Latin America, but were, in their bid to expand at any cost, a truly global issue facing each and every one of us.

Since their letter exchange the people of Doima, who are opposing mining behemoth Anglo Gold Ashanti and the La Colosa gold mine, have continued to reach out to those communities resisting the extractive industries. They have sent letters all around the world, from Alaska to South Africa, sharing their story, seeking and offering support and beginning to web up a movement to protect Earth from the increasingly brazen extractive industries.

Thousands of miles away, community members from Krobo also wrote to the residents of Balcombe, and seeing the parallel letter sent from Colombia, contacted The Gaia Foundation through allies at the Global Justice Forum. Struggling against the presence of HeidelbergCement/Scancem on their lands, the community wanted to connect with the people of Doima, to let them know that they are supported every step of the way.

The Gaia Foundation were able to put them in touch, and a letter from the Doima community to Krobo swiftly followed in September 2013, to which the people of Krobo and their allies responded.

In the struggle to end the ecocide perpetrated by extractive industries worldwide, the value of these kinds of connections cannot be underestimated. For often-isolated communities, messages of solidarity affirm that they are not alone; that they are supported. This energises their future resistance and is a principle which is echoed across those participating in the Yes to Life, No to Mining movement. These letters provide the opportunity for communities to learn from one another, to discuss how they are resisting, what has worked and why. Ultimately, they can help geographically disparate groups coalesce and emerge as larger social movements for justice, with greater power to realign our societies into a life-enhancing relationship with Earth.

In Solidarity

You can read the letters between Doima and Krobo, and find out more about their stories here:

Doima-Krobo solidarity letter

Krobo-Doima solidarity letter

Below is the moving letter, which united those struggling against the impact of mining across distant continents. Here you can read an interview with Mariana Gomez who wrote this letter on behalf of the people of Doima.

 

Dear Balcombe UK inhabitants,

We are reaching you from Colombia, South America. We have been astonished by all you efforts and resistance in order to keep the fracking companies out of your town, and we address this letter because we feel identified with your struggle.

We are inhabitants of a small town called Doima, in the Municipality of Piedras, in a region called Tolima, on the Andes Mountains, near the Magdalena river basin. Anglo Gold Ashanti, a huge gold mining corporation, arrived at our town at the end of last year with the interest of installing a processing plant for the rock extracted from one of the potential biggest gold mines in the world, La Colosa.

Five years ago, this company received the license to explore the possibility for exploitation of the dissipated gold in a forest reserve area, with an approximate production of almost 759 tons of gold in all its production stage, acquiring one gram of gold per ton of removed rock. This region is very vulnerable because of its steep mountains, rich forests and vast water wealth. When the company received the license, it was made clear that the leaching facilities couldn’t be built in this area. But the question of where it would be held was never answered…

Doima, 100 kilometers in a straight line from the mine, is the ideal place to install the leaching facility, because of its abundant water resources and aquifers. On January 31st the town’s inhabitants, peasants and farmers, worried about their environment, occupied the only bridge that gives access to the town and the company’s working place, on La Opia river. This was a way to start a pacific protest held with banners with pro-life and water protection messages, and to block vehicles and employees of the corporation, leaving them with no access to provisions and working tools. As it was to be expected, the company found its way of entering the area.

Despite of the insistent presence of the corporation in the region, the majority of the community is against mining activities, and insists that the company should abandon their land. Calling for help to the competent governmental authorities the protest on the bridge continued. Our people have resisted the police, who have exercised their power by guarding the company, and the municipal mayor received a lawsuit from the company, for allowing the violation of their free transit right, and the community had to rethink their strategy, but they didn’t abandon their cause.

Piedras Municipality lives from what they produce from the earth. Farmers have rice crops and other products like plantain, manioc and maize. This is why the region is called the “agricultural pantry” for the country. Worries about the future of this region have not disappeared, but grown with the presence of the company and with the various governmental actions benefiting foreign companies for their investment strategies of extraction projects in the country.

Consequently, the community did a formal request to the local government authorities in order to hold a popular vote referendum in the municipality so the inhabitants would be who proclaim if they agree on a mining project in their territory. After the long process this request has to go through in order to be legal, the referendum finally took place last Sunday, July 28 with the following question:

“Do you agree as an inhabitant of the Piedras municipality, Tolima, with the development of exploration, exploitation, treatment, transformation, transport, wash of materials result of large scale gold exploitation activities in our territory; storage and use of harmful substances for health and the environment, like cyanide and/or any other toxic substance or material associated to these activities, and for these to use superficial and underground water resources from our territory in mining activities or any other similar development that can affect or limit the provision of drinking water for human consumption and the traditional productive agricultural activities of our municipality?”

The results of the election vote were imminent. Of 5,105 people enabled to vote, there were 3,007 voters of which 2,971 voted against mining and only 24 votes were in favor of these activities. On behalf of Colombian Law 134 of 1994, this decision should be of mandatory fulfillment for our government, because more than one third of the possible voters participated, and the voters against mining won with more than 50% of the votes.

The community had to formally request the government to make the “Popular Consultation” by popular vote. This is a civil participation mechanism that appears with our new Constitution in the year 1991. Analysts say this will put local and regional governments in debate with the national government because the later will have to decide if it will give legitimacy to this democratic exercise, or will go forward with the development of investment projects without regarding the peoples opinion.

Our former government has great interests in opening opportunities for large investment extraction projects, and the Minister of Mines and Energy has manifested that the last word will be in the ANLA ́s (Environmental Licenses National Agency) hands. Some months ago, the national government signed a decree (0934 of May 9 2013) that removes the possibility of the municipal governments to decide if they destine mining zones in the environmental arrangement of their territory, leaving this decision in the hands of the ANM (Mining National Agency) and ANLA. This decree was sued by the Mayor of Bogotá (our national capital), declaring it “anticonstitutional”. However, because of this decree, the Minister of Mines could argue that the results of the votes does not count in the governments final decision.

About a month ago, the ANM Agency also established a resolution that declares some mining projects as “of national interest”, for which the AGA project of La Colosa is on the list. This “national interest” concept appears very abstract when taken into account that not only AGA ́s project is on the list, but other polemic projects in the country like: the Drummond coal mine project which entered a strike last week and who ́s owner is sued in the USA for disappearing nearly 600 Colombian civilians in the past; The Santurbán gold mine, which has been very criticized because of its location in one of our endemic high mountain ecosystems (páramo) only found in Venezuela and Colombia; and the Cocigo Gold Mine project in the Vaupés Amazon region also called “the South American Avatar”, which is located within a protected area, which is illegal regarding that this national park figure is the only one in the country that protects the subsoil.

Unified and pacific resistance have been key for our process, and now our government shall decide if it will recognize the voice of its citizens in a democratic exercise, or shall it award the international interests? Autonomy and participation in decision-making is the core of our Constitution as a democratic republic.

In spite of this, yesterday morning, the Minister of Environment and Sustainable Development said on the radio that government shall wait for the pronunciation of the Minister of Mines, who said that the subsoil belongs to “the nation”, and it shall be the national government who takes the decisions. This concept of “the nation” appears abstract when it was the nation’s citizens who clearly pronounced themselves through an official mechanism. Anyhow, Piedras is for now only one of many options for the leaching facility ground as AGA has said, and that there shall not be any subsoil resources utilized in this municipality. Anyhow, the Piedras community did not vote against the subtraction of natural resources from the subsoil in their territory, but against any mining activity in its jurisdiction. Beyond this debate, the real debate here is how democratic actions are taken about by the government and to what extent can civilians really participate in the decision making of projects that will affect them, their land and their future.

This is why we want to manifest our support and express our solidarity to the inhabitants of the town of Balcome in the United Kingdom, and other communities around the world that are resisting extractive activities in their territory, and recommend the UK government to listen to its people and involve them in the decision taking regarding their land and future. In consequence, we are interested in establishing a constant communication with these communities in order to initiate a brothership and global network between communities with peaceful resistance efforts.

Please receive warm regards and the best of luck from Colombia.

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